Browsing Tag

parenting

EDUCATION

Why the Finns are right when it comes to early childhood education?

If you’re on Facebook, you probably saw on your feed the clip from Michael Moore’s “Where to Invade Next” that talked about Finnish children who spend comparatively little time at school, don’t get homework and yet receive one of the best educations in the world.

I’m all for it. What happens in Finland validates my own observations and belief. Observing how my son and his little friends behave showed me that kids learn essential emotional, social and cognitive skills when they play, explore, experiment, invent, make and create art projects. Moreover, I don’t see why, as a parent or a society, we would need to push them away from enjoying their childhood. Continue Reading

EDUCATION

Parents, do you make this mistake?

Something happened last night that reminded me of what it is to be a parent. What triggered it is something that all parents do at one time or another. We do it without thinking about what message it send to our kids. I know. I almost did it a few minutes earlier. Seeing the scene through strangers made me question these little remarks. Continue Reading

FAMILY

Why Prescholers Need Some Time Off as Much as You Do

vacation at the beach

We sometimes forget that our little ones have a busy life. They have a lot of fun at daycare but, like you, having a break from their weekly routine is beneficial for them. Why should we confine their vacation time to summer?

My husband and I are both entrepreneurs. We need time off a few times a year, not just in summer. We use that time to recharge our body and free our mind. We usually spread our vacation time over the year. I believe that our toddler boy feels the same. Continue Reading

FAMILY

I Am Proud to Be An Older Mom

proud to be an older mom

I became a mom after 40s. I gave birth so late that my age group doesn’t appear in fertility tables. I was 47 years old when I gave birth to my beautiful son. For readers who are aware of the congenital heart defects of my son, it has nothing to do with my age. I don’t have any fertility stories to share since my son was conceived naturally. What I want to do here is addressing misconceptions about midlife parenting.

Some call us selfish to have waited so long, others assume that we do it to fill void in our life. Personally, I feel that it is better for everyone — that is, you and your kids — when you are ready to be a parent. Continue Reading

FAMILY KIDS products

Day Care Essentials

day care essentials

Besides the obvious diapers, wipes, clothes and sunscreen tube, these are items that you may need to bring at your toddler’s day care or nursery school. A playful backpack is not really required — since I usually carry it for my 18 months old son — but I think that it adds a cute touch. In my book, the classic Croc shoes work the best for wearing inside all year long since they can be wore with or without socks.

I was glad that the day care asks for a toothbrush and toothpaste. They will teach my son how to use it. Some day cares supply the sheets for nap time while others ask that you bring your own. Both options have their pros and cons. More importantly for me is the fact to bring them a doudou. Zack likes to hold his muslin blanket while he sleeps. His must have plush is Mr. Tsé Tsé. I bought him a new one to bring at the day care because I don’t want to risk the chance of forgetting it one day. My husband called the second one, Yé Yé. So far, he doesn’t care for it. I still want to hope that he will develop some attachment towards Yé Yé.

Here are the specific items that I brought at the day care:
day care essentials

Something New: 1.  Hippo zoo backpack by Skip Hop $20 USD, 2. Kids’ Crocband II.5 $36.99 CAD, 3. Stage 1 toothbrush by Oral-B and Colgate toothpaste, 4. VITAMINER RAND 4-piece crib bedding set $14.99 CAD

Something Old: 5. Mr. Tsé Tsé beginner doll by Raplapla $44 CAD, 6. Aden + Anais Star-bright swaddle set $49.95 for pack of 4

Next week, I will tell you about labelling your toddler’s things.

EDUCATION

My Son Started Day Care This Week

ready for daycare

Almost one year ago, I pondered whether my baby should attend day care or hire a nanny. I went with the nanny for several months. He was the right call at the time. After seeing Zack played at the park all summer, I realized that Zack would benefit more by being with kids of his age. So, two weeks ago I started my search for the perfect day care / nursery school for him.

Continue Reading

FAMILY LIVING with kids

Parenting Tips: How I Get My Baby to Sleep All Night

How to get my baby to sleep through the night?

My husband and I are the lucky parents of a loving baby that sleeps all night since he is 3-week old. We can’t take all the credits since Zack arrived from his 3-week hospital stay this way.

At four weeks, Zack made us understand that he didn’t want us to wake him anymore for feeding. His doctors said it was OK to let him guide us to what he needs. He drank plenty of milk during the day. He quickly moves to sleeping 6 hours, 7 hours, 8 hours and so on, without a bottle. He sleeps for 10 to 12 hours every night in his nursery since he is 3 or 4 months.

At a time where having a good night sleep is a luxury for most new parents, I felt truly blessed. So, I did some reading to make sure that my baby continues to sleep well. I learned that a few simple rules made it possible. For the ones who doubted that it applies to most babies, you should give a try to know if it works before you make a decision. I read that this method provides a high success rate.

Differencing Night and Day

The first rule for sleeping all night is that your baby must grasp the difference between night and day. Once your baby distingues nighttime, you can teach your baby that night is made for sleeping. It starts by lowering the lights and reducing the noises in the house near bedtime. The light and noise trick comes from the hospital. This is what they do at the NICU.

Short Bedtime Routine

We try to keep our bedtime routine short and simple. Ours used to take up to 45 minutes when he was a few weeks old. Now that he is 17 months old, it takes about 10 minutes. Zack understands it. In fact, he is looking forward to our bedtime ritual. Our babysitter reproduces the same ritual once a week with the same level of success than us. While my husband is prepping his last bootle feed, I change his diaper and put on his pyjama. We feed him in our living room before we move him to his room upstairs.

For about a year, we waited until he was asleep in our arms and then, gently put him in his crib. Sometimes after he reached one year old, we slowly moved away from waiting that he was completely asleep before leaving the room. Later, our son started to tell us that he did not want to be in our arms and that he prefers to go straight to his bed.

We currently feed him a bottle, brush his teeth, mommy quickly gives him a kiss and he goes straight to his crib. After putting my baby in his crib, we turn his pendant light off, we strategically place two OXO nightlights around his room and illuminate his ceiling with stars and a moon. We tell them the story about how the sun went down and the dark sky gets brighter. We only provide him with a dark sleeping environment at nighttime. We have a little play session with a plush toy or we sing him a few songs before we tell him good night. A baby can easily relate to these steps and understand what is coming next.

Everyone, including my baby, is happier since my baby falls asleep by himself, at naptime and at bedtime. I feel that you must do that step when your baby is ready for it.

Give Your Baby Time to Learn How to Sleep

Babies must learn how to stay asleep when they are transitioning from one sleep stage to another stage. This is one of the reasons why they cry. Waking them when they are transitioning from one sleep stage to the next only makes it harder for them to learn that most important skill when it comes to sleep. When this happened, your baby can still be asleep. Give your baby the few minutes he/she needs to make the transition. So wait a few minutes — my limit is 5 minutes —before you rush by the crib. It will be a lot easier to do this if you must get up in the middle of the night and walk to their nursery than if your baby sleeps next to your bed.

Comfort only when Needed

From what I read, the earliest a baby can learn how to sleep on his/her own, the easiest it will be to acquire the skill. I can bring comfort to my baby in my arms if he woke up in tears (arrived a lot when he does his teeth), but he will return to sleep in his crib after that. I often found that he only wants a fresh diaper. Like I said earlier, we quickly reached a point I didn’t need to feed him during the night.

Keep the Noise Down at Night

To further help your baby distingues between night and day, it is best that they sleep with no noises at night and that they can nap hearing your day activities.

What about Naptime?

To not confuse them, rely on a different routine at naptime. Your baby needs to know that we only expect a short sleep.This is why when he was younger, he slept in his room only at night. He napped in the crib of his playard in a corner of my living room during the day.

As he grows older, I tried several napping techniques.  To tell you the truth, I had more problems with establishing a regular naptime than sleeping at night. My boy used to fight me even when he was tired. For the past few months, we found a way that suits him. I tell my son that I will see him soon and that we will play after he sleeps. I often leave him with a book in his crib. He decided when to fall asleep; which is usually a few minutes after I left his room. One important visual cue remains: I partially close his blinds so he sees that their is still light outside.

I know that every parent and baby is different. My technique might not suit your parenting style. My goal is simply to provide food for thoughts. Any comments, any tips to add? How did you teach your infants to sleep at night?

FAMILY LIVING with kids

Happy Baby: Will It Be Day Care or a Babysitter?

babysitter daycare

babysitter daycare

Many questions came to my mind before I took my decision. What would be the best for my baby? What about the development of his social skills? Where can he interact with other kids if he doesn’t go to day care? How much schedule flexibility do I really need? What are the costs associated with each option? Can I find a vacancy at a good day care close to my home?

I experienced the typical guilt and worries of working moms when it’s time to return to work. Ideally, I would like to spend time with my son in the morning and to send him to day care in the afternoon. On the other end, I wonder if kids under 2 years old are not too young to go to day care. I worry that he will not get enough attention from the caregivers if he goes to day care. Many parents that I know sent their kids to daycare around 1 year old. Their kids enjoy it and they are well-adjusted. Maybe that my fear comes from the fact that I never went to day care. I couldn’t decide what to do.

As it turned out, the final decision came from medical reasons. My son’s neonatal pediatrician suggested to delay day care until next spring, if we can. This is a precautionary measure to avoid the flu season. So what would I do? I want to return to work this winter. Babies and toddlers that go at day care benefit from being with other kids and from being outside the house without their parents. And I read that kids who do not attend day care could be more shy around kids. Can he catch up later? To find the answer, I investigated the impact for a baby of not having daily social interactions with kids of his ages.

I wanted a professional opinion. So I asked the occupation therapist who followed my son when he was at the hospital. She reassured me when she told me that developing proper parents-baby relations are what really count up to 1 year old. If he needs to stay away from day care for a little bit longer, say until 2 years old, he should be able to catch up later.

I do not know yet when I will be ready to send him to day care. I just know that he will at some point. In the meantime, I am looking for baby and toddler activities where he can socialize with kids of his age. Who knows, it might be him that tells me when he’ll want to go to day care?

My Conclusion

A part-time babysitter will take care of him for now. After considering all factors, this is what I am the most comfortable with at this point. It’s a smooth transition that addresses his and my needs. The babysitter will allow me to work for a set numbers of hours per week, without baby distractions. I will be able to attend meetings and events, like I used to do.

There are still many unanswered questions. How do I set the boundaries between my work and my family life? Is it feasible to maintain those boundaries while working mostly from home? Time will tell if and how long I can manage being a mom and running my business from home with the help of an in-house childcare provider.

I am curious to know how you did it? Which childcare arrangement worked best for you and your baby/toddler: a babysitter, a nanny or day care?

SOURCING:
+ photo: Zoo Packs by Ship Hop $20 USD